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20110701
20110731
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will wreck the climate and we will wreck the oceans. >>reporter: and big brand bikes mean business in india, as demand for luxury two wheelers revs up >>i walked into the mall and they had this showroom, i saw the bikes and i knew had to get one. >>reporter: hello and welcome. i'm raya abirached and this is world business, your weekly insight into the global business trends shaping our lives. three decades of urbanization and economic reforms have lifted hundreds of millions of chinese out of poverty. the big concern now is how to keep feeding them. changing diet, increasing demand and tightening supply threaten the country's food security. it's a delicate balancing act and one that has implications for commodity markets worldwide. >>reporter: dragon spring village, in the hills above chongqing - where li xingming's family has worked the fields since the 19th century. >>before, our village never planted vegetables, only rice. now, we grow vegetables and we grow less rice, we just grow what we need. >>reporter: this growing and changing demand is coming from china's ever expanding cities - w
for choice. in the crowded cities of india, big isn't always best. more and more indians are choosing cars that are easy to afford as well as easy to park. >> reporter: in new delhi's business district. 2.5 million automobiles were sold in india last year which is up 120% from five years ago. japanese car maker nissan motor built a factory in india last year and introduced the low-priced model entering this giant model in earnest. nissan's rivals are not lagging behind. this popular model from germany's volkswagen is next. toyota also introduced a low-priced automobile. it costs about 9,000 u.s. dollars. the least expensive of all sold in india. hatch backs which are shorter than ordinary cars are especially popular in india's growing market of inexpensive automobiles. in the center of new delhi in this parking lot, you can see large number of hatchback cars parked here. hatchbacks are popular because they are easy to park. there are not enough parking lots. a car parks too close on this street of the business district. >> parking problem, you have to have a hatchback vehicle. >> reporter:
a brighter future for kenyan schoolchildren. >>and how adventure sports are making splash in india. >>extreme india... and the rest in just a moment on world business... >>reporter: around 85% of people in the world now pay to use a mobile phone, and in countries like kenya, where politics & geography can be a serious impediment to the roll out of fixed line internet connections, the mobile phone is playing an increasingly vital role. >>kenya is now a country connected. >>an astounding 99% of the internet traffic in kenya is done through mobile operators. >>there are 22 million mobile subscribers and although only 15% have mobile internet, en the humble text message is having a dramaticeffect. >>if i want to maybe get the raw materials or maybe manure i can order them via my phone and i'll get them supplied. i can also pay whatever i have purchased, if it is the fertilisers, or the pesticides all of them. >>reporter: 31 million kenyans have no bank account, so the ability to buy and sell goods in even the most remote are through person-to-person sms money transfers has made a huge difference
-- in india, investigators were ordered this week to open the vaults of a 16th century hindu temple where they discovered an estimated $22 billion worth of valuables -- bags of gold coins, jewels and gold statues of hindu deities. officials think much of the collection came from the royal family that once controlled the area. some argue the items should be given to charity, others say they belong to the temple. india's supreme court ruled that a museum should be set up to house the treasure. >>> finally -- in conjunction with the dalai lama's visit to washington this week, tibetan monks are constructing a sand mandala, a symbolic structure that represents the buddha's dwelling and the idea of impermanence. in 2007, we visited auburn theological seminary in new york, to watch the building of a similar sand mandala, this one by monks from the dalai lama's private monastery in india. karen humphries sallick organized the monk's 2007 tour and explained the significance of the mandala practice. >> the mandala is a teaching and meditation tool so that we can focus on evoking in ourselves the bu
, the sisters from india, nigeria and the philippines. they're also older. one-third are well above retirement age. the oldest is 93. >> in the past decade, a dozen nuns have died. like most of the monastic communities, glencairn is smaller than it used to be. >> but six women are in formation, on the path to becoming nuns, far more than might be expected. only nine women entered religious orders in all of ireland in 2006, according to the most recent survey. >> i knew that people wouldn't be rushing in the door, but i am surprised at how occupied i am actually with inquiries from people of all different ages. people from 20 to late 60s, so is, and there are a steady flow of inquiries about this kind of life. >> several times a year the abby hosts monastic experience weekends for women of all ages who want to try it out. and they share the experience in more modern ways, too, on their web page, and even on facebook where they have picked up more than 400 fans. >>> i feel the monastic life has an enduring kind of appeal. i don't see it as part of the traditional catholicism that is in demise, i
the coordinated bomb blasts in india's financial capital. >> ifill: political editor david chalian takes us inside president obama's record- breaking 2012 money haul. >> woodruff: paul solman reports on an ohio company that guarantees its workers jobs even during a recession. >> a vast, century old lincoln electric in the heart of the rust belt, workers average $28 an hour and yet there hasn't been a layoff here in at least 70 years. >> ifill: and we check in on how the pentagon is repealing its "don't ask, don't tell" policy starting with the acceptance of gay recruits. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them
of almost 10%. sales were fueled by china, india, and russia. sales actlly dropped in germany, but they expect strong growth in the second half of the year had it is on drive to achieve a sales record of 1.3 million vehicles this year. the stock market shrugged off the weaker than domestic sales data. our correspondent who says the summary of trading from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> they spilled water into the wine, but overall, investors have been content with the numbers. the have been a few gainers here today. the reported numbers, general motors, have more cars expected before. that wasot able to raise the move in general. after wall street started in negative territory, the also tracked down the markets here in frankfurt. there were various love games that we have seen on monday. >> we can stay for a closer look at the market numbers. the much-changed. they and the day in negative territory at 2850. markets there back in action after a long holiday weekend. ) much flack, market's closing about of the to go. and the value of one u.s. dollar, 4418. the former french fi
is driven mainly by demand from the emerging economies. brazil, russia, india, and china. exports to eurozone countries were also strong and up more than 17% compared to the same month last year. >> i a diffent pture on the other side of the atlantic. the labor market in the united states i i struggling more than expected. the government said job creation is far weaker than expected and the unemployment rate in the united states rose unexpectedly last month to 9.2%. >> the american economy appears to be faltering. the federal reserve recently lowered its growth forecast. few companies are hiring. fewer consumers are buying. economic experts fear the u.s. could slide into recession again. the emplment rateremains stubbornly high. the jobless rate has topped 9% for almost two months in the last two years. that has not happened since the 1930's. there is no sign of improvement. president barack obama said u.s. businesses were facing the challenges. >> from natural disasters to spikes in gas prices, state cuts have cost thousands their jobs. the problems in greece and europe along wi
. we had our reasons for abstaining. together with india, brazil, china, and russia -- the decision has now been made. we continue to stand by our resolve that germany will not send any combat troops as part of a military mission in libya. >> germany's preing for a seat on the security council, is that realistic? >> it isn't so much about germany or europe's wish for a permanent seat on the security council. reforming the united nations is primarily about adapting the architecture of the un to reality. the current makeup of the security council and of the united nations itself largely reflects the distribution of power and the political situation at the end of world wawar ii. the fact that latin america has no permanent representation on the security council, that africa has no permanent representative, that asia is so unr-represented, these things are no less significant than our offer as germans to take on more permanent responsibility on the security council.. >> the german foreign minister, thank you very m much r talking to us. that has been our "in depth." you can logon to our web
.s. troops this year. the remaining 23,000 will leave by september of next year. in india, investigators in mumbai searched for clues in wednesday's triple bombing that killed 17 people and wounded 130 more. others demanded answers to how the city was attacked again, despite stepped-up security. we have a report narrated by john sparks of "independent television news." >> reporter: there was no warning. placed in the streets of mumbai the aftermath of one blast, a few hours later detectives began their investigation. a series of bombs detonated in rapid succession. this not the work of suicide bombers said the police. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, secu
should drink. i heard a book by an indian that is india indian and not native american and saying you're not sick, you're thirsty. >> we do recommend eight or nine glasses of water a day. >> really for helping process your food, detoxifying, not for hydration. >> i think water's very important. >> yeah, well, we do talk about that. >> i think a liter before 10:00 in the morning. >> there's a whole chapter on that. >> early detection of cancer's quite fascinating, this book has fascinating -- i'm not trying to sell the book i just find here with the current interests that i've discovered in some programming that i was doing that antioxidant advances, free radical defenses, enzymes and antiobjection i dances, mark grossman, to what extent did you contribute to this book? i know that you're a coauthor but what is your particular content area? >> well, terry grossman here, and ray and i established a relationship a number of years ago and i became ray's personal physician and in the course of our conversations with one another, we created a compendium information that we decideded to codi
105 boys for every 100 girls. in china, it is 118 boys for every 100 girls. and in india, it's 112 boys for every 100 girls. and in the port city in china the sex ratio is 163 boys for every 100 girls. with fewer and fewer girls, men are facing a life without marriage. >> men are going to great lengths to find wives. they're buying them, women are being trafficked from poorer places to richer countries. and all of these secondary human rights abuses are happening as a result of the imbalance. we'll see tens of millions of men who won't be able to find wives if they want them >> women are at a premium. they have more opportunities than ever before many are being pressured to get married and have children. >> for some women in -- women who were born in to cities, in to areas of high sex ratios, they may have advantage. may be able to demand more from their husband. for the vast majority of women, it will be a setback. >> there will be more pressure on women to get married, to take on domestic roles. just by the shear fact that there are fewer of them. >> erica, why do you think they
play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we have a different economic system, different experience. said you can say whatever you want but whatever light are you going to shine on kick-starting the tradition is going to help us. we might not take everything you say. but we are too caught up in our indonesian struggles. and the other thing, charlie that we have in this country. we have possibly the most extraordinary resources, literal resources on islam and muss lim societies that no other country in the world has. e lrary at chicago, harvard's major library, princeton's library has terials an literary resources in arabi, petitionian, turkish, in every language. we have experts that can tell y about details about practices of islam in indonesia to timbuktu. and but t
to india. i ew none of the that. but i had the chance charlie to thank him from the bottom of my heart. he changed my lynch. and i have a son who i a teacher. teachesnglish in high school. and i'm so proud that that's what he's doing, so proud that he is having that kind of affect on the students he's teaching. and having, making his mark as a citizen, as a human being that way. >> charlie any regrets? >> me? >> charlie: yes. >> no. >> charlie: no. >> oh, some, of course. >> charlie: no great obsession, there's no great goal, there was no great sort of untain that you didn't climb. >> the best decision i ever made was to go to washington to though a job i had here in new york, good job, to the winds and go to washington in. new kennedy administration. when he said ask not what your country can do for you but wt youcan do for your country. i took that to hea. i went down and got a job at the usia when edward meryl was thee and opened upy life beyond journalism for me. at's when i found the photographs taken after the flood and i want to read more bit. i took books o and they didn't, the
as opped to fundamentals. the emerging markets, developing markets, gynea-- china, brazil, india all have better growth prospects in terms of a rather underdeveloped consumer sector and the ability to grow from that standpoint versus the developed markets. in addition they have trillions of dollars worth of reserves whereas the developed countries are in hawk to those nations so from those standpoints the developing countries are in much better shape going forward over the next five to ten years as opposed to the developed. >> gillian? >> onef the most interesting things that moodies said this week when it gave warning that it might downgrade the u.s. debt fm aaa was that it was leaving the ratings of companies, large american companies unchanged. and essentially the underlying, somethg you are already seeing in market prices where in the markets right now the risk attacks to sereign debt is actually higher than some of the big, solid american companies or similar patent in europe as well. and that's very unusual. but essentially what moodies was saying and what you are seeing in the mark
that secretary clinton took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by the way, they want us to manage the relationship with china in a positive constructive way. >> rose: can the chinese fear that we're... want to be too big a player in the region and lookin the secretary speech in vietnam, for example? >> that's a gd questionnd one that's debated in china and i'd answer it this way. the chinese recognize-- and i've spent a lot of time with the leaders of china over the last too and a half years and that's a very interesting article published boy their state counselor and for your viewers who dot have the chinese foreign ministry on their list serve, you can rea about this in the last chapter of henry kissinger's book "on china." fascinating discussion. >> rose: he's the most prominent person in chinese foreign policy and he was a participant in the dialogues. >> exactly. so there's a debate in china about
of china and india and the economic growth of those emerging nations. it has to do with the fact that technology s no respect for boundaries which we are discovering in the middle east right now, right. >> absolutely. >> where do you come down on that in terms of america because you're leaving america. >> yh. america h ha great natural resources, huge amount of land and that's been extremely important in its growth. but it also has respeed science and innovation. and we see great growth areas. i mean california and in the boston area in particularly and i think america recognizeds the importance of human capital. i think that's intellectual capital and the generation of ideas. but it needs more nurturing. i mean science education in the u.s. is not up to scratch. >> what does that mean not up to scratch. >> it'just not generating enough educated individuals either those that would actually go into science which is what we're mainly talking about here, but also producing an educated population who can actually coribute making decisions in democracy that are increasingly going to
, india, brazil, and south africa accept make it work. >> rose: in your opinion china, >> >> yes. >> rose: you came away with what sense of their ambition? >> well, this is clearly a country with an enormous national will to... >> rose: solve internal problems? >> to develop, to become wealthy and powerful and to overcome what they see as a century and a half of national humiliation at the hands of the west. that's a huge drive. how it does that i think this is a country which sees many options and could go several different ways. i mean, the one thing almost everyone you speak in china agrees on the it's not going to have the same system in 20 year's time that it has today. whereas in the united states you think you have basically the same system that you've had for a few centuries and more. >> i think ai wei wei had said this. that you do not expect reform to comele from the generation that's now takingower that replaces hu jintao and wen jiabao but you expect genuine reform to come from the next generation, which could mean literally eight ars from now. >> right. >> rose: because the n
in the world because you've got these rising powers, china, india, brazil, but we don't -- >> but we don't -- what they antarctica late, what we don't yet know is what they stand for. what is their big idea. what are these now powers going to bring to the world. so everybody is still lookinto america for the leadership and ashomas sa america is still the tent pole but europeans and everyone, i think, are asking can where is u.s. headed it cannot gone wh these levels of deficits and debt. mething has to be done but the one thing president obama has not articulated is some broad vision for the united states to compete in the world. energy is one very obvious area tha tom writes a lot about. i was recently in copenhagen, in copenhagen they are now heeding the entire city this winter, last winter by burning their own gar badge. there are dramatic changes going on. why is green technolog being lead by scandinavia, by asia. and that vision is just lacking. >> let me open that up with everybody. the idea of obama leadership, i mean as did has said is not acted boldly where he might have want h
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19